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In Memory of Hiroshi Hosokawa

Name: Hiroshi Hosokawa
Spouse: Mariko
Children: Shigeishi, Takami, Tadamichi
Birth Date: April 11, 1951
Blessed Date: February 8, 1975
Ascension Date: August 8, 2019

Hiroshi Hosokawa was born on April 11, 1951 in Mutsu City, Aomori Prefecture, Japan. The second son of six children to Kanjiro and Yoshie Hosokawa, he attended elementary, middle and high school in his hometown before gaining employment at Mitsubishi Heavy Industries in Kanagawa Prefecture.

From a young age, he enjoyed nature and he liked making things related to radios and electronics. On days he wasn’t working, he liked to travel, and on one of his trips, he met the church.

In 1975, Hiroshi met his wife Mariko at the 1800 Couples Marriage Blessing, with whom he would share more than 40 years of his life together. In 1976, he came to the United States with the IOWC, and participated in the Yankee Stadium and Washington Monument rallies with the church. After that, he went on to work on building boats and boat trailers, building maintenance, and then to maintaining and repairing industrial machinery.

When the two started a family while he was working as a manager of an apartment building in New York, Hiroshi made most of the things they wanted or needed at the time. He always used to say, “Don’t say ‘Please do it’, say, ‘Let’s do it together’”, and the two would draw blueprints based on her ideas, saw wood, and make cabinets and such together. Although they didn’t have much money, they still were able to make a comfortable home for themselves. Between 1980 to 1983, they had three children: Shigeishi, Takami, and Tadamichi. They are now blessed with 10 grandchildren.

Hiroshi was very skilled with his hands and frequently gifted handmade wooden toys to his children and grandchildren. He also liked to learn and was very knowledgeable about many things. He was normally a quiet and reticent person, but if asked about something, he would surprise you by talking on and on about his thoughts and opinions. He had a strong sense of justice and was a very kind person who would often make time to spend together with his wife, often helping her by taking photographs with his camera.

After a long battle with diabetes and its complications, Hiroshi passed away on August 8, 2019. For the last several years, he was increasingly having difficulty with his vision and had trouble walking on his own. It was becoming more and more difficult for him to live and act independently. His departure at this time may be from his kindness and consideration so as not to trouble those around him, while at the same time, freeing himself from his own pain. Even though it was not a long one, we believe he lived a happy life.

Seonghwa Ceremony
Date: Monday, August 12 at 7:00 PM, Viewing at 5:00 PM
Location: Morizzo Funeral Home, (2550 Hassell Rd., Hoffman Estates, IL 60169)

A Won Jeon Ceremony will be arranged at a later date.

Financial donations are also welcome to support Hiroshi’s family during this very important time, as well as your loving thoughts and prayers. Donations can be sent to: Mariko Hosokawa at 5540 Pebblebeach Dr. Hanover Park, IL 60133

Comments (12)

  • John Hitchler

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    Thoughts and prayers are with you Hiroshi. Bless your family who still abides. Love you Brother

    Reply

    • Rev. Craig Williams

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      Spending our prayers.

      Reply

  • EG Pierson

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    Blessings to you and your family, brother.
    Yes, “let’s do it together.”
    Aju!

    Reply

  • Jerry Heying

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    I worked with “Hoso” at the World Mission Center when he was in the Engineering Department and I was the Building Manager. We had a special interest in a unique engine we both thought was a messianic engine. Will always have fond memories of him and short time working together.

    Reply

  • Toshio Kuwahara

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    I worked together with him and used to live with his family together in NJ. Our children and their children grew up together. A lot of good memories with him and his wife. A great person, we missed you very much, “Hoso”. Love, Kuwahara’s

    Reply

  • George Brewer

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    Dear Mariko and family,
    DJ and I will always remember sharing a home with your wonderful family in New Jersey. We are sorry to hear about Hoso’s passing, and wish your family the best at this time. We also pray for Hoso’s smooth transition and hope that he soars to new heights in the spirit world. I always appreciated his straight forward and unbiased voice when we worked together. He is part of my fondest memories when working for Saeilo.

    God Bless your family,

    George and DJ Brewer

    Reply

  • Joe Kinney

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    Hoso
    We were in Saeilo together for six years. You were always the man with real engineering ability, substantial character, sincere faith, hard work, and deep faith.
    I respect you and admire you.
    Oh yeah, I almost forgot……I cherish your generous heart of love and your crazy sense of humor.
    God bless you my friend.
    Joe Kinney

    Reply

  • Barry M Geller

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    God Bless the Hosokawa’s and Mr. Hosokawa as he ascends to Heaven.
    Thank you for all you did for True Parent’s and all of us in Saeilo. You
    touched many hearts.
    Sincerely

    Reply

  • Richard K Moore

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    Hiroshi, and his teammate Hiroshi Tanaka, and I all worked down in the third cellar (3C) of the World Mission Center in the the late 70’s, the two Hiroshis in engineering and me on the electrical team.
    I will never forget how he stopped doing all work at the end of December one year to clean up his work areas so he and Tanaka could begin the new year with a clean, fresh, and uplifting working environment. I’d never seen that before, but he said it was a normal thing to do in Japan.
    Hiroshi had what he called’speed prayer’. He would sit down to eat on the 2nd floor dining room in the WMC, and with a bow of his head, he’d be done with his prayer and begin eating. We used to say were were doing ‘silent song and speed prayer’ before eating.

    He didn’t talk much in English, but I was very amazed that this skinny guy could lift heavy machinery, and it was because of his prior engineering work at Mitsubishi and his knowledge of leverage.
    He was an inspiration to us on house staff even though he didn’t say much in English. He was also mush valued and trusted by Jerry Heying and everyone else taking care of the World Mission Center. They trusted his opinion.
    God Bless Hiroshi.
    Richard Moore, EIT, MRE
    retired math & science teacher

    Reply

  • Peter Perry

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    Our condolescenses to you. We’ve known you since 1981. We were in Saeilo together. I worked with Mr. Hosokowa in Chicago. He was writing post processors for Teksoft. We miss you and we’ll keep you in our prayers. For me it’s very meaningful. Antonella & myself are also born in 1951. And Mr. Hosokowa ascended on our daughter’s birth day. August 8th . Bill Flowers ascended on my spiritual birthday August 5th. We were members of Saeilo together. We love you and we’ll meet again!!!

    Reply

  • JOHN CHAMLEY

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    My greatest respect to our brother Hoso. As a young twenty something kid from England around 1981 before Saeilo, he was my boss for about a year and a half making the boat trailers. He likes people who work hard and he is a hard worker too. But not just that, he likes things done in the most effective way. Hoso is a thinker and I learned that you could always expect some persecution from him if you mess up without thinking things through thoroughly! Thank you for those lessons! Those machine shop and early Saeilo times were among the most special in my life in America and I appreciate having had the chance to work with you during those times.

    My wife found the announcement of Hoso’s passing and she remembered his straightforward nature. I hope the Hosokawa children inherited some of those special traits from their Father. Our sympathies go out to you, the family and Mrs. Hosokawa. It’s never easy is it? However, in my mind, one of the greatest things we learn in our Unification movement is the reality of the Spiritual World. It means that we will all be there together again some day – and of course even while we are still here on the Earth. Hosokawa San, God Bless you on your new journey.

    Reply

  • Susan Nishio

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    He was a real human being. While so many were full of bluster and honing their super-powers, he was quiet and enjoyed himself inventing ways to do things that no one dreamed possible. His work, it seems now looking back, was his play, as he made prototypes for Louis Livermore Laboratories. Once he needed to adjust the turning rate of a lathe which he did by attaching a belt from one lathe to another lathe, about 6 feet away. Whatever he did it seemed second nature and he could go from one type of machine to another machine as if they were his family members, just talking and engaging them. He always seemed happy and always knew what he was about. I think leaders felt safe with him, and while others found him to be a brother who would help whenever, however he could. Best wishes to you all.

    Reply

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