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Grief Support Resources

Links to Grief Counseling and Support Organizations

These well-established groups can help members transition through grief. Few of our movement’s leaders have been trained in this area but there are well-established groups and trained counselors who many have found beneficial in getting past difficult times.


Hospice Foundation of America – Support Groups

Many grieving people wonder if they would benefit from joining a support group. Support groups are a time-tested method of help for people struggling with all sorts of difficulties. But groups are not magic; there are no words that can be uttered within a group setting that can make grief disappear.

Groups are places to work together to support one another; they are places where everyone gives and takes. Not everyone will find a support group suitable; each individual grieves in his or her own way.  For many, however, support groups have much to offer.

www.hospicefoundation.org/End-of-Life-Support-and-Resources/Grief-Support/Support-Groups


The Compassionate Friends (For support when a child passes)

The mission of The Compassionate Friends: When a child dies, at any age, the family suffers intense pain and may feel hopeless and isolated. The Compassionate Friends provides highly personal comfort, hope, and support to every family experiencing the death of a son or a daughter, a brother or a sister, or a grandchild, and helps others better assist the grieving family.

Time has proven that in Caring and sharing comes healing. Whether your family has had a child die (at any age, from any cause) or you are trying to help those who have gone through this life-altering experience, The Compassionate Friends exists to provide friendship, understanding, and hope to those going through the natural grieving process. Through a network of almost 700 chapters with locations in all 50 states, as well as Washington DC, Puerto Rico, and Guam, The Compassionate Friends has been providing support to bereaved families after the death of a child for four decades.

www.compassionatefriends.org


National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization

The National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization (NHPCO) is the largest nonprofit membership organization representing hospice and palliative care programs and professionals in the United States. The organization is committed to improving end of life care and expanding access to hospice care with the goal of profoundly enhancing quality of life for people dying in America and their loved ones.

There is no right way to grieve. It is an individual process and a natural part of life. Life won’t be the same after a loss, but experiencing your grief will allow you to adjust to life after loss.Grief lasts as long as it takes to adjust to the changes in your life after your loss. It can be for months, or even years. Grief has no timetable; thoughts, emotions, behaviors and other responses may come and go.

www.nhpco.org/resources/grief-and-bereavement


Access Help

Nothing compares to the comfort and care of talking to someone who’s been there. The Access Help site offers a comprehensive list of Grief Support organizations.

www.accesshelp.org/resources/grief-support-orgs/


Reconciled by the Light

Ron lost his firstborn seventeen-year-old son to suicide. He began a journey, learning from mediums and other spiritual guides to connect with his son and others in the spiritual realm. Along this journey, he experienced more fully the realization that life is spiritual at its core.  The site offers books, workshops, and resources to help others get past the grief and find a connection to the reality of life after physical death..

www.reconciledbythelight.com/


After Death Communications

This site was created in December 1996, to serve as a forum for sharing After-Death Communications (ADCs) and related spiritual experiences, and to offer other services for inspiring greater awareness of ADCs, bereavement support, and spiritual development. An After-Death Communication (ADC) is a spiritual experience, which occurs when you are contacted directly and spontaneously by a deceased family member or friend, without the use of psychics, mediums, rituals, or devices of any kind. In addition to After Death Communication information the site also has a comprehensive list of grief support organizations and publications.

www.after-death.com/Pages/Resources/Organizations.aspx


The American Academy of Grief Counseling

The American Academy of Grief Counseling offers comprehensive, quality, Certification and Fellowship programs for qualified professionals including, physicians, nurses, counselors, social workers, funeral directors, clergy and other professional providers practicing the specialty of Grief Counseling. The AAGC offers a two-tier program beginning with Certification of Grief Counselors with advancement to Fellowship status in the Academy. The American Academy of Grief Counseling is part of The American Institute of Health Care Professionals Inc., a professional organization serving various health care professionals.

www.aihcp.net/american-academy-of-grief-counseling/


The National Widowers’ Organization

The National Widowers’ Organization is a virtual toolkit for men coping with the loss of a loved one, a place where men can meet others going through the same transition.

There are a lot of things men suffer alone. That’s part of our DNA. We find great personal satisfaction in accomplishing on our own, independently. We famously won’t ask for directions, won’t admit when we are lost – we prefer to find our own way home. And eventually, we do. Most of the time. And that’s fine; that’s our way. But, as new and continuing research shows, there’s one loss that men could use a little help from their friends to cope with. That’s the loss of a spouse or a lover or a parent or a child or a lifelong friend. And it’s often help that only other men can provide. Because we understand, many times without saying the words, where you’re at, how you got there and even why.

www.nationalwidowers.org


Therapy Tribe

Articles, resources, and advice about loss, as well as contact information for grief therapists around the country.

www.therapytribe.com/therapy/loss-grief-counseling


Good Therapy

Bereavement refers specifically to the process of recovering from the death of a loved one. Grief is a reaction to any form of loss. Both encompass a range of feelings from deep sadness to anger, and the process of adapting to a significant loss can vary dramatically from one person to another, depending on his or her background, beliefs, relationship to what was lost, and other factors. This site offers valuable information on approaching and getting past the various stages of grief and bereavement.

www.goodtherapy.org/learn-about-therapy/issues/grief


Soul Care Project

www.soulcareproject.org/help-guides/grief-loss


Grief Counseling Ideas (self-help, worksheets, etc.)

www.pinterest.com/explore/grief-counseling/


Also look for local support.


Books on Grieving and Loss

On Grief and Grieving: Finding the Meaning of Grief Through the Five Stages of Loss

Ten years after the death of Elisabeth Kübler-Ross, this commemorative edition of her final, highly rated book, combines practical wisdom, case studies, and the author’s own experiences and spiritual insight to explain how the process of grieving helps us live with loss. Includes a new introduction and resources section. Just as On Death and Dying taught us the five stages of death—denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance—On Grief and Grieving applies these stages to the grieving process and weaves together theory, inspiration, and practical advice, including sections on sadness, hauntings, dreams, isolation, and healing. This is “a fitting finale and tribute to the acknowledged expert on end-of-life matters”


Best Sellers in Grief & Bereavement

www.amazon.com/Best-Sellers-Books-Grief-Bereavement/zgbs/books/4610


Top 10 children’s books on death and bereavement

www.theguardian.com/childrens-books-site/2015/feb/05/top-10-childrens-books-on-death-bereavement-holly-webb


I Wasn’t Ready to Say Goodbye: Surviving, Coping and Healing After the Sudden Death of a Loved One

Now there is a hand to hold…

Each year about eight million Americans suffer the death of someone close to them. Now for those who face the challenges of sudden death, there is a hand to hold, written by two women who have experienced sudden loss. This updated edition of the best-selling bereavement classic will touch, comfort, uplift and console. Authors Brook Noel and Pamela D. Blair, Ph.D. explore sudden death and offers a comforting hand to hold for those who are grieving the sudden death of a loved one.

Featured on ABC World News, Fox and Friends and many other shows, this book acts as a touchstone of sanity through difficult times. It covers such difficult topics as the first few weeks, suicide, death of a child, children and grief, funerals and rituals, physical effects, homicide and depression. New material covers the unique circumstances of loss, men and women’s grieving styles, religion and faith, myths and misunderstandings, I Wasn’t Ready to Say Goodbye reflects the shifting face of grief.


Beyond Tears: Living After Losing a Child

Meant to comfort and give direction to bereaved parents, Beyond Tears is written by nine mothers who have each lost a child. This revised edition includes a new chapter written from the perspective of surviving siblings.

The death of a child is that unimaginable loss no parent ever expects to face. In Beyond Tears, nine mothers share their individual stories of how to survive in the darkest hour. They candidly share with other bereaved parents what to expect in the first year and long beyond:

*Harmonious relationships can become strained

*There is a new definition of what one considers “normal”

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